Is the paleo diet a healthy diet

By | January 24, 2021

is the paleo diet a healthy diet

Her work in eating disorders includes a six month fellowship at NewYork- Presbyterian Hospital and New York Psychiatric Institute, employment as a dietitian on the inpatient eating disorder unit at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, and now as a dietitian at Walden Behavioral Care since October Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Biomedical research. Paleolithic nutrition for metabolic syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis, 2. From a nutritional standpoint, adhering to certain parts of this diet can result in potentially damaging consequences. Soak such grains in salted water for hours, rinse and then cook well before consuming. Also referred to as the “Primal”, “Caveman” or “Stone Age” diet, the Paleo Diet is based on core principles from our hunter-gatherer, ancestral lifestyle. It may also have other beneficial health effects.

Heralded for its long list of health benefits, the Paleo Diet has made its way into the mainstream over the past few years thanks to numerous best-selling books and TV celebrities such as My Kitchen Rules chef Pete Evans spreading the word about Paleo. Pete’s book Family Food has enjoyed much success, and Paleo based food blogs and programs are springing up all over the internet. Converts are raving about the diet in their social circles and gyms, leaving many of us wondering what exactly is this Paleo diet we keep hearing all about? Also referred to as the “Primal”, “Caveman” or “Stone Age” diet, the Paleo Diet is based on core principles from our hunter-gatherer, ancestral lifestyle. Although at first glance it may appear to be another new fad diet, Paleo is actually about returning to a simpler, healthier way of eating that supports health and well-being. Mark Sisson, author of the best-selling book The Primal Blueprint, explains that while the world has changed in innumerable ways in the last 10, years, the human genome has changed very little and thus only thrives under similar conditions. While Paleo followers won’t be found throwing spears or wearing lion furs, the “Paleo way” does go beyond the foods we eat by emphasising healthy lifestyle habits such as getting enough sleep, stress reduction, sun exposure, exercise, and avoiding harmful substances. Eat Drink Paleo blogger and author, Irena Macri, says that in today’s world we are largely desk-bound, consuming packaged, processed foods, living with chronic stress, and not getting enough sleep, all of which can make us sick, fat and depressed. To achieve optimal health, the Paleo lifestyle draws its core principles from our ancestors who ate whole, unprocessed foods, moved more, slept better and stressed less. It’s not about re-enacting the Paleolithic era, says Macri, but rather recognising our genetic predisposition and applying current knowledge of how different foods and activities affect our body’s functions like metabolism, digestion, insulin sensitivity, and systemic inflammation.

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The Paleo Diet — commonly known as the Caveman Diet — traces back millions of years to the era of early humans. If our ancestors thrived on the food they hunted and gathered — high fat, animal protein, seafood and vegetables, for instance — we should too. While some studies link weight loss and overall health improvements when following the Paleo Diet, many remain skeptical regarding its overall effectiveness. From a nutritional standpoint, adhering to certain parts of this diet can result in potentially damaging consequences. Here are five hidden dangers to consider. Low to moderate carbohydrate intake. Hidden danger: Paleo calls for the exclusion of cereal grains — wheat, rye, barley, oats, corn and brown rice, to name a few. These are great sources of fiber, B vitamins, iron, magnesium and selenium. Grains help our bodies control blood sugar, lower cholesterol and fight the risk of chronic diseases. Consistent low carbohydrate intake may lead to an overuse of fat for energy, also known as ketosis.

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